Trash-2-Cash Master Case: Fashion Fascia

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Dutch Design Week 2018 is in full swing! And that means you can come see the results of the Trash-2-Cash project right now. In the final unwrapping of our 6 Master Case ‘stories’ and their prototype products you see that we’ve not just been looking at sustainability within the fashion industry. The Fashion Fascia Master Case explores a circular future for automobile interiors.

Master Case summary

By law, cars of the future will be increasingly required to use recycled and recyclable materials in their production. The Trash-2-Cash recycling technologies allow the proposal of new modes for manufacturing visually appealing, high-quality automotive interior plastics using recycled plastic pellets, recycled textiles and recyclable resin.

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The challenge

Currently, cars are mostly manufactured with virgin materials, including composites (combinations of materials) that can’t be recycled. Recycled materials are mostly unattractive and remain hidden. New regulations coming into force will require car manufacturers to use more and more recycled and recyclable materials; this will mean using them in the visible areas of the car where aesthetic standards are higher.  

The Trash-2-Cash automotive designers turned their attention to the car interior, where recycled materials could be an eye-catching feature. They focused on the central console and door inserts – the decorative areas by the gearshift and door handles. The designers wanted the new materials to add an individual touch and be luxurious, as well as being made from recycled materials and fully recyclable at the end of their useful life.

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The innovation

Trash-2-Cash scientists and designers explored a variety of material innovations using T2C recycled polymers and fibres, laser etching, an innovative recyclable epoxy resin and textile print design. In one example recycled PET pellets from old fleece dressing gowns have been injection moulded to produce a central console panel for a car interior. Customisable laser etching adds to the surface decoration, removing the need for additional treatments. In several other experiments a creative print design approach was used to finish different non-woven recycled polyester textiles and then encapsulate them in the new recyclable resin. This set of experimental samples extends this approach even further, reworking recycled polyester wadding with industry-ready finishes, to add value through design.

These innovations have produced a number of distinctly different but beautiful decorative fascia pieces, showing new material directions for cars of the future.

Trash-2-Cash? About the project

As we all know, one resource that’s becoming more abundant is waste. The idea of recycling textile waste has been popular for decades, but current mechanical methods give poor quality fabrics suitable only for industrial applications, like insulation, and the upcycling of pre-consumer textile waste into products is impossible to scale. 

Trash-2-Cash (T2C) proposes a new model where textile waste is regenerated chemically - resulting in new plastics and textiles that are the same quality as new materials, to make products that are industrially replicable and infinitely recyclable.

Come to our showcase at Klokgebouw during Dutch Design Week 2018 and decide for yourselves whether we have been able to make trash in to cash!

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The consortium:

Academic and industry designers have been collaborating with scientists and engineers over the last three years to produce these new materials from textile waste. It’s a project that is as much about the way in which these people collaborate as what they have produced together. 

The 18 partners from 10 countries are showing six brand new material prototypes comprised of new, recycled and recyclable apparel and automotive materials and concepts. We are also sharing a new way of working – Design-Driven Material Innovation (DDMI) – outlining how science, design and industry can input into the process from beginning to end.

Trash-2-Cash is a collaboration of the following organisations:

-      Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Finland

-      IK4-CIDETEC Technology Centre, IK4 Research Alliance, Spain

-      The Copenhagen Business School (CBS), Denmark

-      Grado Zero Innovation (GZI), Italy

-      MAIER, Spain

-      Material ConneXion Italia Srl, Italy

-      Reima, Finland

-      RISE Research Institutes of Sweden

-      Celanese, Italy

-      SOEX, Germany

-      SÖKTAŞ, Turkey

-      Swerea, IVF, Sweden (from October 1st2018, RISE,Sweden)

-      TEKO, Sweden

-      Tekstina, Slovenia

-      University of the Arts London (UAL), United Kingdom

-      VanBerlo,The Netherlands

-      VTT, Finland

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About Dutch Design Week:

In October of each year, Dutch Design Week (DDW) takes place in Eindhoven. The biggest design event in Northern Europe presents work and ideas of more than 2600 designers to more than 335,000 visitors from home and abroad. In more than hundred locations across the city, DDW organises and facilitates exhibitions, lectures, prize ceremonies, networking events, debates and festivities.

 

Exhibition details:

Saturday 20th October – Sunday 28th October 2018

Opening hours: 11:00 – 18:00

 

Klokgebouw Cultuurhallen

Klokgebouw 50,

5617 AB Eindhoven,

The Netherlands

 

DDW ‘Basic’ ticket:

€16 ‘early bird’ ticket booked before 20th September from www.ddw.nl/tickets

€18 full price advance purchase tickets

€20 at the door

 

Students receive a 30% discount. Premium tickets are also available from the DDW website.